Relocating with Children: The Single Parent Know-Alls

Are you separated from your spouse and thinking about moving with your child? Before jumping on a plane, there are key questions that you need to ask and certain factors that you need to be aware of.

Firstly, does your child spend more time with you then they spend with your ex-spouse? If so, a court is more likely to allow you to relocate with your child than if the child spends equal parenting time with both parents. If your child spends equal parenting time with both you and your ex-spouse, then the only consideration a court takes into account is what is in the best interest of your child.

If you do not have equal, or near equal, parenting time with your ex-spouse then the considerations are different. A court will require that:

  1. You have made a proposal for reasonable and workable arrangements to preserve your child’s relationship with their other parent, persons who have contact with them, and persons who play significant roles in their lives; and
  2. Your proposed relocation is made in good faith.

What are reasonable and workable arrangements?

In the case of Hansen v. Ferguson, 2015 BCSC 588 the court found the mother proposed reasonable and workable arrangements to preserve the father’s relationship with the children by sharing all travel costs, returning to Victoria twice a year with the children, transferring all available travel points to the father for his use, and providing regular Skype contact and email reports when he was at sea.

Although every case is different, sharing the cost of travel, planning trips home, and ensuring the children remain in contact with the other parent are all factors that the courts will consider as reasonable and workable arrangements. Keeping in mind the courts want to see that your child will be able to maintain his or her relationship with their other parent.

What is the meaning of good faith with regards to relocation?

Good faith is defined in s.69(6) of the Family Law Act and includes:

  • the reasons for the proposed relocation;
  • whether the proposed relocation is likely to enhance the general quality of life of the child and, if applicable, of the relocating guardian, including increasing emotional well-being or financial or educational opportunities;
  • whether 60 days’ notice of an intention to relocate was given; and
  • any restrictions on relocation contained in a written agreement or an order.

Accordingly, if you can satisfy the court of the above, then the relocation is presumed to be in the best interests of the child and should thus be granted, unless the children’s other parent satisfies the court otherwise.

Returning to the case of Hansen v. Ferguson the court found that the mother had shown her cost of living would be substantially less in Ontario to that of Victoria, and the proposed move was well planned. The mother would have more emotional supports in Ontario through extended family and support of her boyfriend.  This would have a trickle-down effect on the children, given that she was the primary caregiver.

The court specifically stated that:

[48]As the primary caregiver, this improvement in the mother’s general quality of life will also benefit the children. However, neither the mother nor the children have personal connections with anyone in Pembroke other than R.W., and the children will be far away from their father, grandmother, aunt and cousin, with whom they have established close bonds. This is, of course, the primary concern, but it does not on its own show an absence of good faith. These children are very young and they have not yet established routines outside of their immediate family lives that are important for them. Adapting to a new life away from their father and his family may be challenging for them, but they will be with their mother with whom they also have very close bonds. And given the mother’s plan to have more time with them and to place them in daycare where they will meet other children, I would expect them to socialize in their new environment reasonably quickly.

[49] In this case, the mother has given a lot of consideration to the impact of this move on her children’s emotional well-being. Despite the separation from the father, I find that the relocation will likely enhance the general quality of their lives.

 

If you are thinking about relocating to a new city, with your child, please contact Velletta & Company today. We would be happy to advise you on the proper procedure and help you satisfy the above requirements.

 

About the Author:

Jade Fraser grew up in Shawnigan Lake and is very proud to call Victoria her home. Before pursuing her education in law, she completed her undergraduate degree at the University of British Columbia obtaining a Bachelor of Science. After living in places such as Saudi Arabia and France, Jade gained a unique set of experiences which contributed to her decision to travel abroad in pursuit of her legal education. Find out more about Jade by clicking HERE